Video

In Bloom

Really interesting cover of Nirvana’s “In Bloom” by Sturgill Simpson.

I’m not a fan of country music – at least not what Nashville churns out right now – but Sturgill’s combination of Randy Travis baritone (to my ear) and some Chris Isaak arrangement on this song are really something.

The song appears on his current album, A Sailor’s Guide to Earth, which is his major label debut.

I especially like how he changes the last line of each verse to “He don’t know what it means to love someone”.

It’s not often that an artist can transform a song by covering it and make it truly sound like there own. Sturgill Simpson’s cover of In Bloom does that and more.

Fantastic reinvention of an iconic track.

Happy Friday!

Six Little Birds

On April 9th the first egg appeared in a nest hidden inside a hanging plant on our porch. On May 12th the last baby bird flew the nest. In between we learned they were House Finches and that the 6 eggs would be laid roughly one day apart, hatch in around 2 weeks, and be fully grown in 2 weeks.

Our bird tenants (and their parents) stuck to the script beautifully. When I could, I snapped some shots. Please enjoy as the whole process was joyous to share with our kids, friends & family who stopped by.

One Little Egg

First day, first egg

Two Little Eggs

Second day, now two eggs

Three little eggs

Third day, three eggs

Six little eggs

Sixth day, six eggs

Six little birds

img_9272

Six little birds

All in a row

Can’t believe they snuggled down like this. Getting too big for the nest.

Last to leave the nest

His parents called & called until eventually he too flew the nest.

My Year of Running

At the outset of the year I’d made the conscious, though not publicly-stated, decision to run 1,000 miles in 2016. So here it is officially: I’m attempting to run 1,000 miles in 2016.

;-)

I have steadily increased my mileage over the past several years from 600-something in 2013 to 700+ in 2014 and finally topping 800 miles this past year. I’ve done this by running more often throughout the week and by stretching my average weekday run distance from about 5k to about 7k and my weekend run distance from 5 miles to 10k.

In January Mashable ran a post about Mark Zuckerberg and his commitment to promoting running with the seemingly-simple goal of running 1 mile per day this year. 366 miles – it’s a leap year, after all – seems like an achievable first step for most folks who either haven’t run ever or don’t run consistently.

I joined the Facebook group for his efforts the day I read the article.

I don’t normally listen to anything – music, podcasts, nothing – but another Facebook post sent by my brother-in-law motivated to share my year-to-date mileage today.

All of which is to say, I’ll likely be even more annoying about my running for the remainder of 2016. If you don’t like the beer blog updates or tweets, you’re sure to be annoyed by these.1

Until next time, I’ll see you out on the streets.

  1. If you want to see my previous attempt at being very descriptive about my running, you can check out this Google Doc, which I’d intended to be an actual book cataloging my first full year as a runner (mid-2010 to mid-2011). I ultimately got too busy and shelved the whole project, called “Around the Year in 365 miles”, mostly because I couldn’t remember how I’d felt during each run.

    A much better example of an interesting running diary/log is the excellent Poverty Creek Journal. I’m only halfway done with the prosaic poetry (non-rhyming and paragraph form), but it’s a fantastic artifact of a runner during a similar timeframe recounting how his runs carried him through a calendar year.

Laboring against Hercules

“A small daily task, if it be really daily, will beat the labours of a spasmodic Hercules.” – Anthony Trollope

Since it’s February 1st (Rabbit rabbit) I figured I can update everyone on the progress I’m making using Day One and Everyday

I didn’t miss a single day writing in the journal and I only forgot to take a selfie 3 times during January. Given my previous performance completing either of these types of tasks in the past, this is a huge win.

My hope is that I’ll have a cool montage (in the case of Everyday) and a wealth of memories and self-knowledge (via Day One), such that each of the small steps I took each day will turn in to a marathon when I’m finished.

I also recorded my second-highest mileage total, running about 90 miles, but it wasn’t nearly daily. It’s the busy time for me at work, so I’m not too concerned about the routine as much as I am the miles, which were high & rewarding.

Maybe through all of this I find some more time to meditate – a habit where my longest streak is about 15 days – to add to my growth potential.

What it is really teaching me is how much time I actually waste that I could be using to contribute something for myself and others. A modicum of effort for a return only time can reap? Compound interest truly is an amazing thing.

Bowie

Other people are saying it better than I could today, so I’ll let them say it. I just want to post this blog as well to add my own raised hand. RIP, David Bowie.

And then there’s this, which is being attributed to the actor Simon Pegg, but was actually retweeted by someone named Simon Pegg (not the actor) on Twitter. Still a great sentiment:

I’ll add one mention of own and that’s the fact that David Bowie was an artist in every sense of the word. Music, theatre, fashion, you name it. And he just kept doing his thing regardless of popular culture, so much so that, for a time, he was “pop”.

That’s the dream, I think. Doing it well, doing it for a long time, doing it your own way.

RIP, David Bowie.